Azalea Inn & Villas (Savannah, Georgia Bed and Breakfast, Vacation Rentals and Event Facility)
  • Categories

  • Archives

Archives

5 Reasons You REALLY Should Visit Savannah During Black History Month

November 28, 2012 by Teresa Jacobson

When you stay at our B&B in Savannah, we think of ourselves as your hosts, and that means we will direct you to the things and places that are REALLY worth it. Let me tell you 5 reasons why making a trip to Savannah for Black History Month is REALLY WORTH IT.  Technically Black History Month is celebrated in February, but we are running a Savannah vacation special in January AND February to celebrate the unique stage our city sets for you to come learn more about the history that is unique to the African American culture. We’ve got a lot of information for you here but don’t wait too long because to take advantage of our special, travel must be completed by the end of February.

Read the rest of this page »

Savannah Black Heritage Festival Celebrates “Journeys, Passages and Transitions”

January 16, 2012 by Teresa Jacobson

What do the Twist, Shag, Mashed Potatoes, Bus Stop, Jerk, Hustle, and the Step have to do with the Savannah Black Heritage Festival?  Fun.  As in Fun-d Raising with a “Dancing Through the Decades” event from 8 p.m.-midnight, Friday, Jan. 20, at the Savannah Marriott Riverfront. I hope to put on my dancing shoes and show my support for this year’s theme, “Journeys, Passages and Transitions.”  But I digress. February is Black History Month and for twenty-three years Georgia’s oldest historically black university, Savannah State University, has brought the richness of black culture and heritage front and center in Savannah, Georgia.

Read the rest of this page »

Exploring Savannah’s Black Heritage

December 15, 2011 by Teresa Jacobson

Black History Vacation at Azalea Inn & Gardens

First African Baptist Church - 1st black congregation in Georgia

Savannah’s Black Heritage is not the most touted tour in our beautiful city and perhaps that is because people tend to step lightly when discussing slavery even after all these years. This subtle attitude however belies the magnificence of the contribution that Savannah’s blacks have given to the fabric of our city. Four inns of Savannah have decided to collaboratively create a package that will highlight some of the best but lesser known historical sites of our city’s black history, culture and heritage.

Read the rest of this page »

Savannah Soul Food Showdown Event

February 18, 2011 by Teresa Jacobson

Well FED Magazine and Black History Month seek out best Soul Food Restaurant in Savannah

Seeking Best Soul Food Restaurant in Savannah

Did you hear about the Soul Food Showdown in honor of Black History Month?  I can’t believed I just learned about a FOOD event only days before it winds up.  Well FED Magazine is the sponsor and the event is easy to join.  Simply eat at one of the following locations, then vote for your favorite restaurant, either in person (at your fav spot), via email (showdown@wellfedsavannah.com) or on Facebook.  Cast your vote and you might be the recipient of a gift certificate to the winning restaurant. 

Read the rest of this page »

Savannah Black Heritage Festival

February 1, 2011 by

When the Gullah people settled in the lowcountry in the 1700s, I bet they never imagined their influence would carry all the way into the 21st century, but The Savannah Black Heritage Festival is in its 22nd year and definitely keeping the culture alive.  The Gullah cherished storytelling, cuisine, music, folklore, and crafts, which can all be found at the fest, running February 1st through the 13th:

Dreaming of Savannah – Rendezvous with an Historic Romantic Southern City

May 7, 2010 by Teresa Jacobson

Part 1:
Savannah is a city of squares, a city whose rhythms change softly from block to diminutive block. Uncommonly pleasant to visit, it seems to have been planned for those who care to take their time and stroll quietly through the 19th century.  

James Oglethorpe’s Squares
The squares were laid out by Gov. James Oglethorpe in January 1733. The source of his inspiration is debated, although many have noted that Oglethorpe had once lived in London and have surmised that his plan for Savannah was influenced by what he had seen there. But it is generally acknowledged that military considerations dictated the small scale of the town – it had to be compact enough to be easily defended. He laid the plans for a city of shaded squares that did not exclude but led at short intervals one to the other, a long vista of oases. Oglethorpe was a man who fought against the Turks and captured Belgrade – a commanding force, but a practical idealist and philanthropist. He was appalled by the misery of debtors in prison, concerned for Europeans who were the victims of religious persecution, and when he set sail for Savannah he brought with him 115 colonists. There were two groups of Jews from central Europe, hardworking Moravians and persecuted Portuguese, and on later trips he brought in highland Scots, Greeks, and some Irish Catholics, as well as his chaplain, John Wesley. The King’s support, insured by the Royal Patent, also had a military motive – to protect the British Colonists further north and beyond from the encroachment of the Spaniards in Florida. Early settlers were city-bred and of no use with an ax or at clearing forests, however there were no blacks in Savannah in the early days – Gov. Oglethorpe hated slavery.  Though indeed the town held out against slavery for a long time, this shortage of labor plagued the general and in the end, the colony caved in on slavery and thousands of blacks came.

Read the rest of this page »

»