Azalea Inn & Villas (Savannah, Georgia Bed and Breakfast, Vacation Rentals and Event Facility)
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5 Reasons You REALLY Should Visit Savannah During Black History Month

November 28, 2012 by Teresa Jacobson

When you stay at our B&B in Savannah, we think of ourselves as your hosts, and that means we will direct you to the things and places that are REALLY worth it. Let me tell you 5 reasons why making a trip to Savannah for Black History Month is REALLY WORTH IT.  Technically Black History Month is celebrated in February, but we are running a Savannah vacation special in January AND February to celebrate the unique stage our city sets for you to come learn more about the history that is unique to the African American culture. We’ve got a lot of information for you here but don’t wait too long because to take advantage of our special, travel must be completed by the end of February.

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What Our Guests are Saying…

November 20, 2012 by Teresa Jacobson

I could rave and rant until I ran out of breath about all the things I love about this bed and breakfast, about Savannah. But I also love discovering what our guests are saying, perhaps even more! It’s important for us to LISTEN and HEAR and RESPOND to what the world is doing. That’s what keeps Azalea shining, growing, welcoming, beckoning…

We’re grateful (especially this holiday week – and by the way it’s not too late to spend your Thanksgiving in Savannah with us) for the guests that tell us about their experiences, and share them! That’s why today we’re bringing you some of our guest reviews – their own thoughts, in their own words.

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Azalea Inn’s Tomato Harvest WOW

July 10, 2011 by Teresa Jacobson

We have had the most incredible garden treats from Azalea Inn and our tomato harvest has inspired our favorite (so far) WOW recipe: Tomato Jam.  I picked the last of our cherry and yellow pear tomatoes  to be turned into our infamous Tomato Jam.  We plan to serve the Jam on Rosemary shortbread at next week’s wine and appetizer hour.  As you can see from the impish faces of Kolin and Courtney, we love our tomatoes!  I am not sure how many of the garden harvested tomatoes made it into the jam, but there was enough for two more canning jars of our oft-requested jam recipe (compliments of Bon Appetite, April 2010).

The recipe itself calls for 5 large tomatoes but we have a plethora of the cherry and tiny yellow pear tomatoes and found that they worked as well, if not better, with the two-tone color. We did not skin these tomatoes as the recipe calls for, instead squeezing the seeds out whole and tossing into the saucepan, no boiling first necessary.

Tomato Jam:

2 1/4 pounds ripe tomatoes (about 5 large)

2 cups granulated sugar

Generous pinch of salt

Generous pinch of ground cayenne pepper

2 or 3 grinds of black pepper

2 or 3 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

Bring a large saucepan of water to a boil. Using a paring knife, cut out the stem end of each tomato, then slice a shallow X in the bottom. Plunge the tomatoes into the boiling water until their skins loosen, about 30 seconds. Remove them with a slotted spoon and let cool.

When cool enough to handle, slip off the tomato skins. Discard the water, but save the saucepan for cooking the jam. Halve the tomatoes crosswise and gently squeeze out the seeds and juice. Chop the tomatoes into 1/3-inch pieces.

Return the tomatoes to the saucepan; stir in the sugar, salt, and peppers. Cook over medium heat, stirring frequently to ensure that the mixture is cooking evenly but not burning, until most of the liquid has evaporated. If foam occasionally rises to the top, skim it off with a large spoon. Remove from the heat and stir in the lemon juice to taste.

Ladle the jam into sterilized jars. Cover tightly, let cool, and refrigerate. The jam will keep for at least 6 months refrigerated, though it has not lasted that long at the inn!

Azalea Inn and Gardens, a Savannah, GA, historic inn.

Welcome to Our Garden of Eating – Part 1

April 5, 2011 by Teresa Jacobson

[singlepic id=172 w=320 h=240 float=left]I spent a bit of yesterday trying to take pictures of our garden… of eating… but found that the pictures were not inspirational.  I squatted close to buds peeping from the grounds, noting the similarities between melon, squash and eggplant spouts.  Beans, whether purple bush, yellow bush or Kentucky Blue, were equally difficult to differentiate.  Thankfully, our consultant farmer, Adam, gave us a layout of the gardens.  But still… my excitement at planting produce for use in the inn was not being magically translated to these flat images.  I needed to be reminded of why we had undertaken such a large project for our tiny urban footprint.

[singlepic id=170 w=160 h=120 float=right]I pulled pictures of last year’s bounty, and it short-lived existence, which produced the desired effect.  I remembered.  I can now compare our minimalist garden plot of last year to Azalea Inn and Garden’s new mini-mini farm situated in the tight space that comprises the long narrow building lots of the downtown historic Savannah and the incorporation of the old plot in a new and more productive way.  Last year’s “Let’s give it a whirl” garden yielded an abundance of tomatoes (Sweet 100’s, Big Boy, Pink Brandywine, to name a few),  fragrant basil, tarragon, sage, dill, chives, garlic chives and lavender, a tiny crop of green peppers, one lone stalk of asparagus, scallions, and near the end of summer, six cantaloupes of varying sizes.

[singlepic id=171 w=160 h=120 float=left]We put our largesse to good use: roasted cherry and yellow teardrops tomatoes for Eggs Pomodoro, chopped herbes into everything imaginable, used up the bell peppers in two batches of Confetti Potatoes, left the asparagus for next year (hopefully), and served the cantaloupes proudly mixed with watermelon and topped with a ginger-lime syrup (house made, of course).  We were quite frankly sad to turn the earth over at the end of the season and return to buying produce.

In early March of  this year, we attended a “Met Your Makers” dinner at the local “earth-to-table” restaurant, Cha Bella, to meet the producers /growers of all things nurtured by the earth (or nutured in loving hands of dairy farmers and artisan bread craftsmen) and used at the restaurant.  There we met Adam Metzger of Adam’s Farm, the young up and coming hydroponics producer of all things vegetable for use at Cha Bella.   Adam was more than willing to take on an urban garden project in historic Savannah, as long as we were willing to get dirty too.

Part 2:  Design, build, plant.   Coming soon.

Romantic Escape, Savannah GA, a Travel and Leisure Top Spot

November 17, 2010 by Teresa Jacobson

Travel and Leisure Magazine has just published a list of America’s Favorite Cities with Savannah taking top spot as the Best Place for a Fall Destination!  But did you know we came second to only Honolulu as best place for a Romantic Escape?  It was no surprise we beat out Charleston in this category.  Don’t get me wrong, Charleston has a been a favorite destination for a long time, but finally, what we all know and love about Savannah is on a list to include (but not limited to):

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Geekend 2010, Historic Savannah, Georgia, November 4-6, 2010

May 14, 2010 by Teresa Jacobson

Is it okay to be a geek? Ever? Well, if you ask the organizers/co-founders of Geekend 2009, Jake and Miriam Hodesh, the answer is foretold in the overwhelming response to Geekend 2009 by both presenters and attendees. The first ever interactive conference for digital media, Web and information technology professionals was held November 6 thru 9, 2009 at the Hyatt in Historic Savannah Georgia. A planned turnout of 100 morphed into 600 something. Thinking Cap, Inc and the Savannah Geekend Conference were born. But let me let them tell you What, Who and Why in their own words:

From the website: www.Geekend2010.com:

What is this Glorious Event?  Unleash the Geek!

Geekend is the annual gathering of the geek tribe in Savannah, Georgia. Geekend is what you might call an interactive conference with some truly awesome parties. It’s kind of the event that you’ll be texting, tweeting, and Facebooking from and all your friends back home will be super jealous.

Geekend is a mashup, a meetup, and a tweet-up all mixed together in a delicious low country boil of innovative ideas. It’s networking, Savannah style. It’s a veritable supermarket of fresh ideas. To sum Geekend up in one word is really quite impossible, but we tend to use this one: Fun.

Who Should Come to Geekend:  You Should!

Whether you are casually twittering, facebooking, texting or obsessively gaming, then you should definitely plan on coming. If you’re writing a super cool iPhone app, then you should come. If you are obsessed with all the digital aspects of music, film and art, then you should plan on breaking it down at Geekend.

Does the future of social media appeal to you? Does the direction of design, online and offline, grab your attention? Are you a creative who is just as adept at building your castles in the digital sandbox as you are at the beach? Then perfect, sign up now, because Geekend is for you.

Why is Geekend in Savannah, GA?  Because Savannah is Awesome!

The city is one of the most incredibly beautiful, cool, historic and fun places to live or visit. That’s because Savannah is a magnet for cool creative types who’ve come here for business, school, the weather, the vibe, the beach, the architecture, the Spanish moss, the friendly locals, great food and energetic nightlife (and the fact that you can legally walk down the street with a cold adult beverage in a to-go cup that we like to call a “traveler”). Oh yeah, we’re also the most haunted city in America, but we get along well with our ghosts. Be aware though, that once you come to Savannah and it casts its spell on you, you’ll probably want to stay.”

What else is there to say?  They’ve said it all – make your reservations early and with us!

Remembrance of Rainy Days Past

October 15, 2009 by Teresa Jacobson

It rained relentlessly yesterday, sometimes sputtering droplets on annoyed heads, and at times so heavy it washed the color completely out of the landscape.  This kind of weather usually means a power outage, and it put me in mind of a day last summer and a funny innkeeping story.

pat-and-robin-newlyweds-500-300x2251It was a wild week at the inn in mid-July, 2008. It began on Monday at about 7 a.m. with a bang – literally – as the transformer behind our carriage house (where Jake and I lived) blew out. Jake quickly donned his pants and keys and unlocked the gate to the back lane to investigate. The culprit didn’t even try to escape. At the bottom of the pole lay a Kamikaze squirrel who single-handily took out several blocks of electricity.

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