Azalea Inn & Villas (Savannah, Georgia Bed and Breakfast, Vacation Rentals and Event Facility)
  • Categories

  • Archives

Archives

Explore Savannah’s Coastal Heritage and Wildlife

July 30, 2015 by Teresa Jacobson

Savannah’s rich history and natural beauty expands deep into the Intracoastal Waterway of the coastline.  For centuries, the rivers and salt marshes have been a way of life for the diverse cultures that call Savannah home.  The Moonriver District encompasses six institutions where you can explore salt marshes, forest trails, Colonial and pre-Civil War history, a contemporary marine center, a historic Gullah Geechee oystering community, a 275 year old farm and school, an un-spoiled barrier island and a centuries old riverside village.  You can explore Savannah’s coastal heritage and wildlife only 20 minutes from Downtown Savannah.

Wormsloe Plantation Historic Site

Wormsloe Plantation Historic Site

1.       Wormsloe Plantation Historic Site

A breathtaking avenue sheltered by live oaks and Spanish moss leads to the tabby ruins of Wormsloe Plantation, the colonial estate of Noble Jones (1702-1775).  Visitors can interact with costumed interpreters, visit the Wormsloe Museum, and stroll interpretive nature trails participating in period programs.

Ford Museum at Bethesda

Ford Museum at Bethesda

2.       The Ford Museum at Bethesda Academy

Explore the deep and diverse history of Bethesda Academy and its significant part of our nation’s history.  The Ford Museum features a look into Georgia’s earliest history and the life lived at Bethesda, founded in 1740.

Pin Point Heritage Museum

Pin Point Heritage Museum

3.       Pin Point Heritage Museum

For nearly one hundred years, Pin Point was an isolated and self-sustained Gullah/Geechee enclave founded by first-generation freedmen.   Pin Point Heritage Museum celebrates the life and history of the culture so deeply connected to the water on the banks of the Moon River.

Skidaway Island State Park

Skidaway Island State Park

4.       Skidaway Island State Park

Experience Savannah’s lowcountry wildlife in the park that borders Skidaway narrows, a part of Georgia’s Intracoastal Waterway.  Trails wind through maritime forest and past salt marsh, leading to boardwalks and an observation tower.  Visitors can explore on their own or take advantage of one of the many programs offered such as hiking with a ranger or bird watching.   The staff at the park’s interpretive center will help guide you find the stunning wildlife of the Georgia coast.

University of Georgia Aquarium

University of Georgia Aquarium

5.       University of Georgia Marine Center Aquarium

The UGA Aquarium features 16 exhibit tanks that showcase a variety of Georgia’s marine life.  Most species are caught by aquarium staff right off the coast.  A public Touch Tank allows visitors to get up close and personal with some of Georgia’s marine invertebrates such as snails and crabs.

Ossabaw Island

Ossabaw Island

6.       Ossabaw Island

Ossabaw Island is the third largest barrier island off the coast of Georgia with 26,000 acres of maritime forest, tidal wetlands and wide beaches on the Atlantic Ocean.  An unspoiled place set aside by the State of Georgia as a heritage preserve for natural, scientific, and cultural study.  The Ossabaw Island Foundation offers programs such as walking with loggerhead sea turtles, archeological digs, and historic cultural practices like indigo dying.  Access to the island is by reservation only.  Visit the Ossabaw Island website for more information.

Azalea Inn and Gardens, a Savannah GA bed and breakfast inn, invites you to reserve a room today to begin enjoying the best experiences in our city, which Travel + Leisure Magazine acclaimed as a “World’s Best City.”

Thanks for reading. Don’t forget to follow Azalea Inn & Gardens on Facebook and Twitter, too!

Pin Point – Black Heritage along the Gullah-Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor

January 3, 2012 by Teresa Jacobson

Pin Point Heritage Museum

Rendering of Pin Point Heritage Museum, Savannah Tribune

Pin Point is a small African-American community located just southeast of Savannah that has been struggling to maintain its black heritage and lifestyle. First settled in about 1896, the community prospered when Varn Seafood located a processing plant there in 1926, and for the next 60 years life was, well, idylic. Now part of the Gullah-Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor, the tiny hometown of Supreme Court Justice Clarence aims to tell the story of freed Sea Islands slaves who founded Pin Point, and to preserve what may be the last piece of Georgia coastline still owned mostly by African-Americans.

Read the rest of this page »

»